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Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

a chance for personality to expand a cappella, and so each reunion will 

have in it something of the surprise, the adventure and the virtuous 

satanry of the honeymoon. The husband will not come back to precisely 

the same wife that he parted from, and the wife will not welcome 

precisely the same husband. Even supposing them to have gone on 

substantially as if together, they will have gone on out of sight and 

hearing of each other, Thus each will find the other, to some extent 

at least, a stranger, and hence a bit challenging, and hence a bit 

charming. The scheme has merit. More, it has been tried often, and with 

success. It is, indeed, a familiar observation that the happiest couples 

are those who are occasionally separated, and the fact has been embalmed 

in the trite maxim that absence makes the heart grow fonder. Perhaps 

not actually fonder, but at any rate more tolerant, more curious, more 

eager. Two difficulties, however, stand in the way of the widespread 

adoption of the remedy. One lies in its costliness: the average couple 

cannot afford a double establishment, even temporarily. The other lies 

in the fact that it inevitably arouses the envy and ill-nature of those 

who cannot adopt it, and so causes a gabbling of scandal. The world 

invariably suspects the worst. Let man and wife separate to save their 

happiness from suffocation in the kitchen, the dining room and the 

connubial chamber, and it will immediately conclude that the corpse is 

already laid out in the drawing-room. 

 

 

 

 

28. Woman as Wife 

 

 

This boredom of marriage, however, is not nearly so dangerous a menace 

to the institution as Mrs. Cox, with evangelistic enthusiasm, permits 

herself to think it is. It bears most harshly upon the wife, who is 

almost always the more intelligent of the pair; in the case of the 

husband its pains are usually lightened by that sentimentality with 

which men dilute the disagreeable, particularly in marriage. Moreover, 

the average male gets his living by such depressing devices that boredom 

becomes a sort of natural state to him. A man who spends six or eight 

hours a day acting as teller in a bank, or sitting upon the bench of a 

court, or looking to the inexpressibly trivial details of some process 

of manufacturing, or writing imbecile articles for a newspaper, or 

managing a tramway, or administering ineffective medicines to stupid and 

uninteresting patients--a man so engaged during all his hours of labour, 

which means a normal, typical man, is surely not one to be oppressed 


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