Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

him, but also women of all ages back to adolescence. Hence his average 

or typical opponent tends to be progressively younger and younger than 

he is, and in the end the mere advantage of her youth may be sufficient 

to tip over his tottering defences. This, I take it, is why oldish men 

are so often intrigued by girls in their teens. It is not that age calls 

maudlinly to youth, as the poets would have it; it is that age is no 

match for youth, especially when age is male and youth is female. The 

case of the late Henrik Ibsen was typical. At forty Ibsen was a sedate 

family man, and it is doubtful that he ever so much as glanced at a 

woman; all his thoughts were upon the composition of "The League of 

Youth," his first social drama. At fifty he was almost as preoccupied; 

"A Doll's House" was then hatching. But at sixty, with his best work all 

done and his decline begun, he succumbed preposterously to a flirtatious 

damsel of eighteen, and thereafter, until actual insanity released him, 

he mooned like a provincial actor in a sentimental melodrama. Had it not 

been, indeed, for the fact that he was already married, and to a very 

sensible wife, he would have run off with this flapper, and so made 

himself publicly ridiculous. 

 

Another reason for the relatively late marriages of superior men is 

found, perhaps, in the fact that, as a man grows older, the disabilities 

he suffers by marriage tend to diminish and the advantages to increase. 

At thirty a man is terrified by the inhibitions of monogamy and has 

little taste for the so-called comforts of a home; at sixty he is beyond 

amorous adventure and is in need of creature ease and security. What he 

is oftenest conscious of, in these later years, is his physical decay; 

he sees himself as in imminent danger of falling into neglect and 

helplessness. He is thus confronted by a choice between getting a 

wife or hiring a nurse, and he commonly chooses the wife as the less 

expensive and exacting. The nurse, indeed, would probably try to marry 

him anyhow; if he employs her in place of a wife he commonly ends 

by finding himself married and minus a nurse, to his confusion and 

discomfiture, and to the far greater discomfiture of his heirs and 

assigns. This process is so obvious and so commonplace that I apologize 

formally for rehearsing it. What it indicates is simply this: that 

a man's instinctive aversion to marriage is grounded upon a sense of 

social and economic self-sufficiency, and that it descends into a mere 


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