Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

enough, has escaped the observation of an otherwise extremely astute 

observer, namely Havelock Ellis. In his study of British genius he notes 

the fact that most men of unusual capacities are the sons of relatively 

old fathers, but instead of exhibiting the true cause thereof, he 

ascribes it to a mysterious quality whereby a man already in decline is 

capable of begetting better offspring than one in full vigour. This is 

a palpable absurdity, not only because it goes counter to facts long 

established by animal breeders, but also because it tacitly assumes 

that talent, and hence the capacity for transmitting it, is an acquired 

character, and that this character may be transmitted. Nothing could 

be more unsound. Talent is not an acquired character, but a congenital 

character, and the man who is born with it has it in early life quite as 

well as in later life, though Its manifestation may have to wait. James 

Mill was yet a young man when his son, John Stuart Mill, was born, and 

not one of his principle books had been written. But though the "Elements 

of Political Economy" and the "Analysis of the Human Mind" were thus 

but vaguely formulated in his mind, if they were actually so much as 

formulated at all, and it was fifteen years before he wrote them, he was 

still quite able to transmit the capacity to write them to his son, 

and that capacity showed itself, years afterward, in the latter's 

"Principles of Political Economy" and "Essay on Liberty." 

 

But Ellis' faulty inference is still based upon a sound observation, to 

wit, that the sort of man capable of transmitting high talents to a son 

is ordinarily a man who does not have a son at all, at least in wedlock, 

until he has advanced into middle life. The reasons which impel him to 

yield even then are somewhat obscure, but two or three of them, perhaps, 

may be vaguely discerned. One lies in the fact that every man, whether 

of the first-class or of any other class, tends to decline in mental 

agility as he grows older, though in the actual range and profundity 

of his intelligence he may keep on improving until he collapses into 

senility. Obviously, it is mere agility of mind, and not profundity, 

that is of most value and effect in so tricky and deceptive a combat as 

the duel of sex. The aging man, with his agility gradually withering, 

is thus confronted by women in whom it still luxuriates as a function of 

their relative youth. Not only do women of his own age aspire to ensnare 


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