Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

all the advantage out of it that is in it. Consider, for example, 

the important moral business of safeguarding the virtue of the 

unmarried--that is, of the still passionate. The present plan in 

dealing, say, with a young man of twenty, is to surround him with 

scare-crows and prohibitions--to try to convince him logically 

that passion is dangerous. This is both supererogation and 

imbecility--supererogation because he already knows that it is 

dangerous, and imbecility because it is quite impossible to kill a 

passion by arguing against it. The way to kill it is to give it rein 

under unfavourable and dispiriting conditions--to bring it down, by slow 

stages, to the estate of an absurdity and a horror. How much more, then, 

could be accomplished if the wild young man were forbidden polygamy, 

before marriage, but permitted monogamy! The prohibition in this case 

would be relatively easy to enforce, instead of impossible, as in the 

other. Curiosity would be satisfied; nature would get out of her cage; 

even romance would get an inning. Ninety-nine young men out of a hundred 

would submit, if only because it would be much easier to submit that to 

resist. 

 

And the result? Obviously, it would be laudable--that is, accepting 

current definitions of the laudable. The product, after six months, 

would be a well-regimented and disillusioned young man, as devoid of 

disquieting and demoralizing passion as an ancient of eighty--in brief, 

the ideal citizen of Christendom. The present plan surely fails to 

produce a satisfactory crop of such ideal citizens. On the one hand its 

impossible prohibitions cause a multitude of lamentable revolts, often 

ending in a silly sort of running amok. On the other hand they fill the 

Y. M. C. A.'s with scared poltroons full of indescribably disgusting 

Freudian suppressions. Neither group supplies many ideal citizens. 

Neither promotes the sort of public morality that is aimed at. 

 

 

 

 

25. Late Marriages 

 

 

The marriage of a first-rate man, when it takes place at all, commonly 

takes place relatively late. He may succumb in the end, but he is almost 

always able to postpone the disaster a good deal longer than the average 

poor clodpate, or normal man. If he actually marries early, it is nearly 

always proof that some intolerable external pressure has been applied 

to him, as in Shakespeare's case, or that his mental sensitiveness 

approaches downright insanity, as in Shelley's. This fact, curiously 


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