Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

sense of superiority is now added the disparagement of a concrete 

comparison, and over all is an ineradicable resentment of the fact 

that such a comparison has been necessary. In other words, the typical 

husband is a second-rater, and no one is better aware of it than his 

wife. He is, taking averages, one who has been loved, as the saying 

goes, by but one woman, and then only as a second, third or nth choice. 

If any other woman had ever loved him, as the idiom has it, she would 

have married him, and so made him ineligible for his present happiness. 

But the average bachelor is a man who has been loved, so to speak, by 

many women, and is the lost first choice of at least some of them. Here 

presents the unattainable, and hence the admirable; the husband is the 

attained and disdained. 

 

Here we have a sufficient explanation of the general superiority of 

bachelors, so often noted by students of mankind--a superiority so 

marked that it is difficult, in all history, to find six first-rate 

philosophers who were married men. The bachelor's very capacity to 

avoid marriage is no more than a proof of his relative freedom from 

the ordinary sentimentalism of his sex--in other words, of his greater 

approximation to the clear headedness of the enemy sex. He is able to 

defeat the enterprise of women because he brings to the business an 

equipment almost comparable to their own. Herbert Spencer, until he was 

fifty, was ferociously harassed by women of all sorts. Among others, 

George Eliot tried very desperately to marry him. But after he had made 

it plain, over a long series of years, that he was prepared to resist 

marriage to the full extent of his military and naval power, the girls 

dropped off one by one, and so his last decades were full of peace and 

he got a great deal of very important work done. 

 

 

 

 

21. The Effect on the Race 

 

 

It is, of course, not well for the world that the highest sort of men 

are thus selected out, as the biologists say, and that their superiority 

dies with them, whereas the ignoble tricks and sentimentalities of 

lesser men are infinitely propagated. Despite a popular delusion that 

the sons of great men are always dolts, the fact is that intellectual 

superiority is inheritable, quite as easily as bodily strength; and that 

fact has been established beyond cavil by the laborious inquiries of 

Galton, Pearson and the other anthropometricians of the English school. 

If such men as Spinoza, Kant, Schopenhauer, Spencer, and Nietzsche 


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