Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

 

 

 

 

18. The Process of Courtship 

 

 

This bemusement of the typical woman by the notion of marriage has been 

noted as self-evident by every literate student of the phenomena of sex, 

from the early Christian fathers down to Nietzsche, Ellis and Shaw. That 

it is denied by the current sentimentality of Christendom is surely no 

evidence against it. What we have in this denial, as I have said, is 

no more than a proof of woman's talent for a high and sardonic form 

of comedy and of man's infinite vanity. "I wooed and won her," says 

Sganarelle of his wife. "I made him run," says the hare of the hound. 

When the thing is maintained, not as a mere windy sentimentality, but 

with some notion of carrying it logically, the result is invariably a 

display of paralogy so absurd that it becomes pathetic. Such nonsense 

one looks for in the works of gyneophile theorists with no experience of 

the world, and there is where one finds it. It is almost always wedded 

to the astounding doctrine that sexual frigidity, already disposed 

of, is normal in the female, and that the approach of the male is made 

possible, not by its melting into passion, but by a purely intellectual 

determination, inwardly revolting, to avoid his ire by pandering to his 

gross appetites. Thus the thing is stated in a book called "The Sexes 

in Science and History," by Eliza Burt Gamble, an American lady 

anthropologist: 

 

The beautiful coloring of male birds and fishes, and the various 

appendages acquired by males throughout the various orders below man, 

and which, sofar as they themselves are concerned, serve no other useful 

purpose than to aid them in securing the favours of the females, have by 

the latter been turned to account in the processes of reproduction. The 

female made the male beautiful _That She Might Endure His Caresses_. 

 

The italics are mine. From this premiss the learned doctor proceeds 

to the classical sentimental argument that the males of all species, 

including man, are little more than chronic seducers, and that their 

chief energies are devoted to assaulting and breaking down the native 

reluctance of the aesthetic and anesthetic females. In her own words: 

"Regarding males, outside of the instinct for self-preservation, which, 

by the way is often overshadowed by their great sexual eagerness, no 

discriminating characters have been acquired and transmitted, other 

than those which have been the result of passion, namely, pugnacity and 


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