Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

and an appearance of vivacity; it is almost unheard of for women to 

neglect more prosaic inquiries. Many a rich man, at least in America, 

marries his typist or the governess of his sister's children and 

is happy thereafter, but when a rare woman enters upon a comparable 

marriage she is commonly set down as insane, and the disaster that 

almost always ensues quickly confirms the diagnosis. 

 

The economic and social advantage that women thus seek in marriage--and 

the seeking is visible no less in the kitchen wench who aspires to the 

heart of a policeman than in the fashionable flapper who looks for a 

husband with a Rolls-Royce--is, by a curious twist of fate, one of the 

underlying causes of their precarious economic condition before marriage 

rescues them. In a civilization which lays its greatest stress upon 

an uninspired and almost automatic expertness, and offers its 

highest rewards to the more intricate forms thereof, they suffer 

the disadvantage of being less capable of it than men. Part of this 

disadvantage, as we have seen, is congenital; their very intellectual 

enterprise makes it difficult for them to become the efficient machines 

that men are. But part of it is also due to the fact that, with marriage 

always before them, coloring their every vision of the future, and 

holding out a steady promise of swift and complete relief, they are 

under no such implacable pressure as men are to acquire the sordid arts 

they revolt against. The time is too short and the incentive too 

feeble. Before the woman employee of twenty-one can master a tenth of 

the idiotic "knowledge" in the head of the male clerk of thirty, or even 

convince herself that it is worth mastering, she has married the head 

of the establishment or maybe the clerk himself, and so abandons the 

business. It is, indeed, not until a woman has definitely put away the 

hope of marriage, or, at all events, admitted the possibility that she, 

may have to do so soon or late, that she buckles down in earnest to 

whatever craft she practises, and makes a genuine effort to develop 

competence. No sane man, seeking a woman for a post requiring laborious 

training and unremitting diligence, would select a woman still 

definitely young and marriageable. To the contrary, he would choose 

either a woman so unattractive sexually as to be palpably incapable of 

snaring a man, or one so embittered by some catastrophe of amour as to 

be pathologically emptied of the normal aspirations of her sex. 


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