Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

particular, for the instinct of maternity. The woman who has not had 

a child remains incomplete, ill at ease, and more than a little 

ridiculous. She is in the position of a man who has never stood 

in battle; she has missed the most colossal experience of her sex. 

Moreover, a social odium goes with her loss. Other women regard her as 

a sort of permanent tyro, and treat her with ill-concealed disdain, 

and deride the very virtue which lies at the bottom of her experiential 

penury. There would seem to be, indeed, but small respect among women 

for virginity per se. They are against the woman who has got rid of 

hers outside marriage, not because they think she has lost anything 

intrinsically valuable, but because she has made a bad bargain, and one 

that materially diminishes the sentimental respect for virtue held by 

men, and hence one against the general advantage and well-being of the 

sex. In other words, it is a guild resentment that they feel, not a 

moral resentment. Women, in general, are not actively moral, nor, 

for that matter, noticeably modest. Every man, indeed, who is in wide 

practice among them is occasionally astounded and horrified to discover, 

on some rainy afternoon, an almost complete absence of modesty in some 

women of the highest respectability. 

 

But of all things that a woman gains by marriage the most valuable is 

economic security. Such security, of course, is seldom absolute, but 

usually merely relative: the best provider among husbands may die 

without enough life insurance, or run off with some preposterous light 

of love, or become an invalid or insane, or step over the intangible 

and wavering line which separates business success from a prison cell. 

Again, a woman may be deceived: there are stray women who are credulous 

and sentimental, and stray men who are cunning. Yet again, a woman 

may make false deductions from evidence accurately before her, ineptly 

guessing that the clerk she marries today will be the head of the firm 

tomorrow, instead of merely the bookkeeper tomorrow. But on the whole it 

must be plain that a woman, in marrying, usually obtains for herself 

a reasonably secure position in that station of life to which she is 

accustomed. She seeks a husband, not sentimentally, but realistically; 

she always gives thought to the economic situation; she seldom takes 

a chance if it is possible to avoid it. It is common for men to marry 

women who bring nothing to the joint capital of marriage save good looks 


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