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Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

responsible for the common masculine belief that women are devoid of 

passion, and contemplate its manifestations in the male with something 

akin to trembling. Here the talent itself is helped out by the fact that 

very few masculine observers, on the occasions when they give attention 

to the matter, are in a state of mind conducive to exact observation. 

The truth is, of course, that there is absolutely no reason to believe 

that the normal woman is passionless, or that the minority of women who 

unquestionably are is of formidable dimensions. To be sure, the peculiar 

vanity of men, particularly in the Northern countries, makes them place 

a high value upon the virginal type of woman, and so this type tends to 

grow more common by sexual selection, but despite that fact, it has by 

no means superseded the normal type, so realistically described by the 

theologians and publicists of the Middle Ages. It would, however, be 

rash to assert that this long continued sexual selection has not made 

itself felt, even in the normal type. Its chief effect, perhaps, is to 

make it measurably easier for a woman to conquer and conceal emotion 

than it is for a man. But this is a mere reinforcement of a native 

quality or, at all events, a quality long antedating the rise of the 

curious preference just mentioned. That preference obviously owes its 

origin to the concept of private property and is most evident in those 

countries in which the largest proportion of males are property owners, 

i.e., in which the property-owning caste reaches down into the lowest 

conceivable strata of bounders and ignoramuses. The low-caste man is 

never quite sure of his wife unless he is convinced that she is entirely 

devoid of amorous susceptibility. Thus he grows uneasy whenever she 

shows any sign of responding in kind to his own elephantine emotions, 

and is apt to be suspicious of even so trivial a thing as a hearty 

response to a connubial kiss. If he could manage to rid himself of such 

suspicions, there would be less public gabble about anesthetic wives, 

and fewer books written by quacks with sure cures for them, and a good 

deal less cold-mutton formalism and boredom at the domestic hearth. 

 

I have a feeling that the husband of this sort--he is very common in the 

United States, and almost as common among the middle classes of England, 

Germany and Scandinavia--does himself a serious disservice, and that he 

is uneasily conscious of it. Having got himself a wife to his austere 


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