Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

embracing the conventional hocus-pocus of the situation. They never 

acknowledge that they have fallen in love, as the phrase is, until the 

man has formally avowed the delusion, and so cut off his retreat; to 

do otherwise would be to bring down upon their heads the mocking and 

contumely of all their sisters. With them, falling in love thus appears 

in the light of an afterthought, or, perhaps more accurately, in the 

light of a contagion. The theory, it would seem, is that the love of 

the man, laboriously avowed, has inspired it instantly, and by some 

unintelligible magic; that it was non-existent until the heat of his own 

flames set it off. This theory, it must be acknowledged, has a certain 

element of fact in it. A woman seldom allows herself to be swayed by 

emotion while the principal business is yet afoot and its issue still 

in doubt; to do so would be to expose a degree of imbecility that 

is confined only to the half-wits of the sex. But once the man is 

definitely committed, she frequently unbends a bit, if only as a relief 

from the strain of a fixed purpose, and so, throwing off her customary 

inhibitions, she, indulges in the luxury of a more or less forced and 

mawkish sentiment. It is, however, almost unheard of for her to permit 

herself this relaxation before the sentimental intoxication of the man 

is assured. To do otherwise--that is, to confess, even post facto, to an 

anterior descent,--would expose her, as I have said, to the scorn of all 

other women. Such a confession would be an admission that emotion had 

got the better of her at a critical intellectual moment, and in the eyes 

of women, as in the eyes of the small minority of genuinely intelligent 

men, no treason to the higher cerebral centres could be more 

disgraceful. 

 

 

 

 

8. The Male Beauty 

 

 

This disdain of sentimental weakness, even in those higher reaches where 

it is mellowed by aesthetic sensibility, is well revealed by the fact 

that women are seldom bemused by mere beauty in men. Save on the stage, 

the handsome fellow has no appreciable advantage in amour over his 

more Gothic brother. In real life, indeed, he is viewed with the utmost 

suspicion by all women save the most stupid. In him the vanity native to 

his sex is seen to mount to a degree that is positively intolerable. It 

not only irritates by its very nature; it also throws about him a 

sort of unnatural armour, and so makes him resistant to the ordinary 

approaches. For this reason, the matrimonial enterprises of the more 


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