Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

with his own honest inclinations and best interests. Whether that 

compromise be a sign of his relative stupidity or of his relative 

cowardice it is all one: the two things, in their symptoms and effects, 

are almost identical. In the first case he marries because he has 

been clearly bowled over in a combat of wits; in the second he resigns 

himself to marriage as the safest form of liaison. In both cases his 

inherent sentimentality is the chief weapon in the hand of his opponent. 

It makes him cherish the fiction of his enterprise, and even of his 

daring, in the midst of the most crude and obvious operations against 

him. It makes him accept as real the bold play-acting that women always 

excel at, and at no time more than when stalking a man. It makes him, 

above all, see a glamour of romance in a transaction which, even at its 

best, contains almost as much gross trafficking, at bottom, as the sale 

of a mule. 

 

A man in full possession of the modest faculties that nature commonly 

apportions to him is at least far enough above idiocy to realize that 

marriage is a bargain in which he gets the worse of it, even when, in some 

detail or other, he makes a visible gain. He never, I believe, wants 

all that the thing offers and implies. He wants, at most, no more than 

certain parts. He may desire, let us say, a housekeeper to protect his 

goods and entertain his friends--but he may shrink from the thought 

of sharing his bathtub with anyone, and home cooking may be downright 

poisonous to him. He may yearn for a son to pray at his tomb--and yet 

suffer acutely at the mere approach of relatives-in-law. He may dream 

of a beautiful and complaisant mistress, less exigent and mercurial than 

any a bachelor may hope to discover--and stand aghast at admitting her 

to his bank-book, his family-tree and his secret ambitions. He may want 

company and not intimacy, or intimacy and not company. He may want a 

cook and not a partner in his business, or a partner in his business 

and not a cook. But in order to get the precise thing or things that he 

wants, he has to take a lot of other things that he doesn't want--that 

no sane man, in truth, could imaginably want--and it is to the 

enterprise of forcing him into this almost Armenian bargain that the 

woman of his "choice" addresses herself. Once the game is fairly set, she 

searches out his weaknesses with the utmost delicacy and accuracy, and 

plays upon them with all her superior resources. He carries a handicap 


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