Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

of ten-penny nails in a hundred weight, or the freight on lard from 

Galveston to Rotterdam. And by the same token one could not imagine him 

expert at billiards, or at grouse-shooting, or at golf, or at any other 

of the idiotic games at which what are called successful men commonly 

divert themselves. In his great study of British genius, Havelock Ellis 

found that an incapacity for such petty expertness was visible in 

almost all first rate men. They are bad at tying cravats. They do not 

understand the fashionable card games. They are puzzled by book-keeping. 

They know nothing of party politics. In brief, they are inert and 

impotent in the very fields of endeavour that see the average men's 

highest performances, and are easily surpassed by men who, in actual 

intelligence, are about as far below them as the Simidae. 

 

This lack of skill at manual and mental tricks of a trivial 

character--which must inevitably appear to a barber or a dentist as 

stupidity, and to a successful haberdasher as downright imbecility--is 

a character that men of the first class share with women of the first, 

second and even third classes. There is at the bottom of it, in truth, 

something unmistakably feminine; its appearance in a man is almost 

invariably accompanied by the other touch of femaleness that I have 

described. Nothing, indeed, could be plainer than the fact that women, 

as a class, are sadly deficient in the small expertness of men as a 

class. One seldom, if ever, hears of them succeeding in the occupations 

which bring out such expertness most lavishly--for example, tuning 

pianos, repairing clocks, practising law, (ie., matching petty tricks 

with some other lawyer), painting portraits, keeping books, or managing 

factories--despite the circumstance that the great majority of such 

occupations are well within their physical powers, and that few of them 

offer any very formidable social barriers to female entrance. There is 

no external reason why women shouldn't succeed as operative surgeons; 

the way is wide open, the rewards are large, and there is a special 

demand for them on grounds of modesty. Nevertheless, not many women 

graduates in medicine undertake surgery and it is rare for one of them 

to make a success of it. There is, again, no external reason why women 

should not prosper at the bar, or as editors of newspapers, or as 

managers of the lesser sort of factories, or in the wholesale trade, 

or as hotel-keepers. The taboos that stand in the way are of very small 


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