Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

equipment of the average male. A man thinks that he is more intelligent 

than his wife because he can add up a column of figures more accurately, 

and because he understands the imbecile jargon of the stock market, 

and because he is able to distinguish between the ideas of rival 

politicians, and because he is privy to the minutiae of some sordid and 

degrading business or profession, say soap-selling or the law. But 

these empty talents, of course, are not really signs of a profound 

intelligence; they are, in fact, merely superficial accomplishments, and 

their acquirement puts little more strain on the mental powers than a 

chimpanzee suffers in learning how to catch a penny or scratch a match. 

The whole bag of tricks of the average business man, or even of the 

average professional man, is inordinately childish. It takes no more 

actual sagacity to carry on the everyday hawking and haggling of the 

world, or to ladle out its normal doses of bad medicine and worse law, 

than it takes to operate a taxicab or fry a pan of fish. No observant 

person, indeed, can come into close contact with the general run of 

business and professional men--I confine myself to those who seem to get 

on in the world, and exclude the admitted failures--without marvelling 

at their intellectual lethargy, their incurable ingenuousness, their 

appalling lack of ordinary sense. The late Charles Francis Adams, a 

grandson of one American President and a great-grandson of another, 

after a long lifetime in intimate association with some of the chief 

business "geniuses" of that paradise of traders and usurers, the United 

States, reported in his old age that he had never heard a single one of 

them say anything worth hearing. These were vigorous and masculine men, 

and in a man's world they were successful men, but intellectually they 

were all blank cartridges. 

 

There is, indeed, fair ground for arguing that, if men of that kidney 

were genuinely intelligent, they would never succeed at their gross and 

driveling concerns--that their very capacity to master and retain 

such balderdash as constitutes their stock in trade is proof of their 

inferior mentality. The notion is certainly supported by the familiar 

incompetency of first rate men for what are called practical concerns. 

One could not think of Aristotle or Beethoven multiplying 3,472,701 by 

99,999 without making a mistake, nor could one think of him remembering 

the range of this or that railway share for two years, or the number 


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