Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

I. The Feminine Mind 

 

 

 

 

1. The Maternal Instinct 

 

 

A man's women folk, whatever their outward show of respect for his merit 

and authority, always regard him secretly as an ass, and with something 

akin to pity. His most gaudy sayings and doings seldom deceive them; 

they see the actual man within, and know him for a shallow and pathetic 

fellow. In this fact, perhaps, lies one of the best proofs of feminine 

intelligence, or, as the common phrase makes it, feminine intuition. 

The mark of that so-called intuition is simply a sharp and accurate 

perception of reality, an habitual immunity to emotional enchantment, 

a relentless capacity for distinguishing clearly between the appearance 

and the substance. The appearance, in the normal family circle, is a 

hero, magnifico, a demigod. The substance is a poor mountebank. 

 

The proverb that no man is a hero to his valet is obviously of masculine 

manufacture. It is both insincere and untrue: insincere because it 

merely masks the egotistic doctrine that he is potentially a hero to 

everyone else, and untrue because a valet, being a fourth-rate man 

himself, is likely to be the last person in the world to penetrate his 

master's charlatanry. Who ever heard of valet who didn't envy his master 

wholeheartedly? who wouldn't willingly change places with his master? 

who didn't secretly wish that he was his master? A man's wife labours 

under no such naive folly. She may envy her husband, true enough, 

certain of his more soothing prerogatives and sentimentalities. She 

may envy him his masculine liberty of movement and occupation, his 

impenetrable complacency, his peasant-like delight in petty vices, 

his capacity for hiding the harsh face of reality behind the cloak 

of romanticism, his general innocence and childishness. But she 

never envies him his puerile ego; she never envies him his shoddy and 

preposterous soul. 

 

This shrewd perception of masculine bombast and make-believe, this acute 

understanding of man as the eternal tragic comedian, is at the bottom 

of that compassionate irony which paces under the name of the maternal 

instinct. A woman wishes to mother a man simply because she sees into 

his helplessness, his need of an amiable environment, his touching self 

delusion. That ironical note is not only daily apparent in real life; it 

sets the whole tone of feminine fiction. The woman novelist, if she 

be skillful enough to arise out of mere imitation into genuine 

self-expression, never takes her heroes quite seriously. From the day 


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