Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

honour in an assemblage of men. She is, moreover, always respected by 

the king, and praised by learned men, and her favour being sought for by 

all, she becomes an object of universal regard. The daughter of a king 

too, as well as the daughter of a minister, being learned in the above 

arts, can make their husbands favourable to them, even though these may 

have thousands of other wives besides themselves. And in the same 

manner, if a wife becomes separated from her husband, and falls into 

distress, she can support herself easily, even in a foreign country, by 

means of her knowledge of these arts. Even the bare knowledge of them 

gives attractiveness to a woman, though the practice of them may be only 

possible or otherwise according to the circumstances of each case. A man 

who is versed in these arts, who is loquacious and acquainted with the 

arts of gallantry, gains very soon the hearts of women, even though he 

is only acquainted with them for a short time. 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[Footnote 11: The author wishes to prove that a great many things are 

done by people from practice and custom, without their being acquainted 

with the reason of things, or the laws on which they are based, and this 

is perfectly true.] 

 

[Footnote 12: The proviso of being married applies to all the teachers.] 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER IV. 

 

THE LIFE OF A CITIZEN.[13] 

 

 

Having thus acquired learning, a man, with the wealth that he may have 

gained by gift, conquest, purchase, deposit,[14] or inheritance from his 

ancestors, should become a householder, and pass the life of a citizen. 

He should take a house in a city, or large village, or in the vicinity 

of good men, or in a place which is the resort of many persons. This 

abode should be situated near some water, and divided into different 

compartments for different purposes. It should be surrounded by a 

garden, and also contain two rooms, an outer and an inner one. The inner 

room should be occupied by the females, while the outer room, balmy with 

rich perfumes, should contain a bed, soft, agreeable to the sight 

covered with a clean white cloth, low in the middle part, having 

garlands and bunches of flowers[15] upon it, and a canopy above it, and 

two pillows, one at the top, another at the bottom. There should be also 

a sort of couch besides, and at the head of this a sort of stool, on 

which should be placed the fragrant ointments for the night, as well as 


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