Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

It appears from the last verse of the manuscript that he was a resident 

of the province of Tirhoot, the son of a Brahman named Ganeshwar, who 

was also a poet. The work, written in Sanscrit, gives the descriptions 

of different classes of men and women, their classes being made out from 

their age, description, conduct, etc. It contains three chapters, and 

its date is not known, and cannot be ascertained. 

 

'The Stage of Love' (No. 6) was composed by the poet Kullianmull, for 

the amusement of Ladkhan, the son of Ahmed Lodi, the same Ladkhan being 

in some places spoken of as Ladana Mull, and in others as Ladanaballa. 

He is supposed to have been a relation or connection of the house of 

Lodi, which reigned in Hindostan from A.D. 1450-1526. The work would, 

therefore, have been written in the fifteenth or sixteenth century. It 

contains ten chapters, and has been translated into English, but only 

six copies were printed for private circulation. This is supposed to be 

the latest of the Sanscrit works on the subject, and the ideas in it 

were evidently taken from previous writings of the same nature. 

 

The contents of these works are in themselves a literary curiosity. 

There are to be found both in Sanscrit poetry and in the Sanscrit drama 

a certain amount of poetical sentiment and romance, which have, in every 

country and in every language, thrown an immortal halo round the 

subject. But here it is treated in a plain, simple, matter of fact sort 

of way. Men and women are divided into classes and divisions in the same 

way that Buffon and other writers on natural history have classified and 

divided the animal world. As Venus was represented by the Greeks to 

stand forth as the type of the beauty of woman, so the Hindoos describe 

the Padmini or Lotus woman as the type of most perfect feminine 

excellence, as follows: 

 

She in whom the following signs and symptoms appear is called a Padmini. 

Her face is pleasing as the full moon; her body, well clothed with 

flesh, is soft as the Shiras or mustard flower, her skin is fine, 

tender and fair as the yellow lotus, never dark coloured. Her eyes are 

bright and beautiful as the orbs of the fawn, well cut, and with reddish 

corners. Her bosom is hard, full and high; she has a good neck; her nose 

is straight and lovely, and three folds or wrinkles cross her 

middle--about the umbilical region. Her yoni resembles the opening lotus 

bud, and her love seed (Kama salila) is perfumed like the lily that has 


Page 3 from 7:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   Forward