Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

the agreement at naught by haling her husband before a magistrate for 

carrying it out, and it is a safe wager that the magistrate would jail 

him. 

 

This plan, however novel it may seem, is actually already in operation. 

Many a married woman, in order to keep her husband from revolt, 

makes more or less disguised surrenders of certain of the rights and 

immunities that she has under existing laws. There are, for example, 

even in America, women who practise the domestic arts with competence 

and diligence, despite the plain fact that no legal penalty would be 

visited upon them if they failed to do so. There are women who follow 

external trades and professions, contributing a share to the family 

exchequer. There are women who obey their husbands, even against 

their best judgments. There are, most numerous of all, women who wink 

discreetly at husbandly departures, overt or in mere intent, from the 

oath of chemical purity taken at the altar. It is a commonplace, indeed, 

that many happy marriages admit a party of the third part. There would 

be more of them if there were more women with enough serenity of mind 

to see the practical advantage of the arrangement. The trouble with such 

triangulations is not primarily that they involve perjury or that 

they offer any fundamental offence to the wife; if she avoids banal 

theatricals, in fact, they commonly have the effect of augmenting the 

husband's devotion to her and respect for her, if only as the fruit of 

comparison. The trouble with them is that very few men among us have 

sense enough to manage them intelligently. The masculine mind is readily 

taken in by specious values; the average married man of Protestant 

Christendom, if he succumbs at all, succumbs to some meretricious and 

flamboyant creature, bent only upon fleecing him. Here is where 

the harsh realism of the Frenchman shows its superiority to the 

sentimentality of the men of the Teutonic races. A Frenchman would no 

more think of taking a mistress without consulting his wife than he 

would think of standing for office without consulting his wife. The 

result is that he is seldom victimized. For one Frenchman ruined by 

women there are at least a hundred Englishmen and Americans, despite 

the fact that a hundred times as many Frenchmen engage in that sort of 

recreation. The case of Zola is typical. As is well known, his amours 

were carefully supervised by Mme. Zola from the first days of their 

marriage, and in consequence his life was wholly free from scandals and 


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