Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

V. The New Age 

 

 

 

 

42. The Transvaluation of Values 

 

 

The gradual emancipation of women that has been going on for the last 

century has still a long way to proceed before they are wholly delivered 

from their traditional burdens and so stand clear of the oppressions 

of men. But already, it must be plain, they have made enormous 

progress--perhaps more than they made in the ten thousand years 

preceding. The rise of the industrial system, which has borne so 

harshly upon the race in general, has brought them certain unmistakable 

benefits. Their economic dependence, though still sufficient to make 

marriage highly attractive to them, is nevertheless so far broken 

down that large classes of women are now almost free agents, and quite 

independent of the favour of men. Most of these women, responding 

to ideas that are still powerful, are yet intrigued, of course, by 

marriage, and prefer it to the autonomy that is coming in, but the fact 

remains that they now have a free choice in the matter, and that dire 

necessity no longer controls them. After all, they needn't marry if they 

don't want to; it is possible to get their bread by their own labour 

in the workshops of the world. Their grandmothers were in a far more 

difficult position. Failing marriage, they not only suffered a cruel 

ignominy, but in many cases faced the menace of actual starvation. There 

was simply no respectable place in the economy of those times for the 

free woman. She either had to enter a nunnery or accept a disdainful 

patronage that was as galling as charity. 

 

Nothing could be plainer than the effect that the increasing economic 

security of women is having upon their whole habit of life and mind. The 

diminishing marriage rate and the even more rapidly diminishing 

birth rates show which way the wind is blowing. It is common for male 

statisticians, with characteristic imbecility, to ascribe the fall in 

the marriage rate to a growing disinclination on the male side. This 

growing disinclination is actually on the female side. Even though no 

considerable body of women has yet reached the definite doctrine that 

marriage is less desirable than freedom, it must be plain that 

large numbers of them now approach the business with far greater 

fastidiousness than their grandmothers or even their mothers exhibited. 

They are harder to please, and hence pleased less often. The woman of a 

century ago could imagine nothing more favourable to her than marriage; 

even marriage with a fifth rate man was better than no marriage at all. 


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