Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

chuck under the chin. 

 

This cynical view of religious emotionalism, and with it of the whole 

stock of ecclesiastical balderdash, is probably responsible, at least in 

part, for the reluctance of women to enter upon the sacerdotal career. 

In those Christian sects which still bar them from the pulpit--usually 

on the imperfectly concealed ground that they are not equal to its 

alleged demands upon the morals and the intellect--one never hears of 

them protesting against the prohibition; they are quite content to leave 

the degrading imposture to men, who are better fitted for it by talent 

and conscience. And in those baroque sects, chiefly American, which 

admit them they show no eagerness to put on the stole and chasuble. When 

the first clergywoman appeared in the United States, it was predicted 

by alarmists that men would be driven out of the pulpit by the new 

competition. Nothing of the sort has occurred, nor is it in prospect. 

The whole corps of female divines in the country might be herded into 

one small room. Women, when literate at all, are far too intelligent to 

make effective ecclesiastics. Their sharp sense of reality is in endless 

opposition to the whole sacerdotal masquerade, and their cynical humour 

stands against the snorting that is inseparable from pulpit oratory. 

 

Those women who enter upon the religious life are almost invariably 

moved by some motive distinct from mere pious inflammation. It is a 

commonplace, indeed, that, in Catholic countries, girls are driven into 

convents by economic considerations or by disasters of amour far oftener 

than they are drawn there by the hope of heaven. Read the lives of the 

female saints, and you will see how many of them tried marriage and 

failed at it before ever they turned to religion. In Protestant lands 

very few women adopt it as a profession at all, and among the few a 

secular impulse is almost always visible. The girl who is suddenly 

overcome by a desire to minister to the heathen in foreign lands is 

nearly invariably found, on inspection, to be a girl harbouring a theory 

that it would be agreeable to marry some heroic missionary. In point 

of fact, she duly marries him. At home, perhaps, she has found it 

impossible to get a husband, but in the remoter marches of China, 

Senegal and Somaliland, with no white competition present, it is equally 

impossible to fail. 

 

 

 

 


Page 7 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6  [7]