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Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

characters. The first imbecility has already concerned us at length. One 

finds traces of it even in works professedly devoted to disposing of it. 

In one such book, for example, I come upon this: "What all the skill 

and constructive capacity of the physicians in the Crimean War failed to 

accomplish Florence Nightingale accomplished by her beautiful femininity 

and nobility of soul." In other words, by her possession of some 

recondite and indescribable magic, sharply separated from the ordinary 

mental processes of man. The theory is unsound and preposterous. Miss 

Nightingale accomplished her useful work, not by magic, but by hard 

common sense. The problem before her was simply one of organization. 

Many men had tackled it, and all of them had failed stupendously. 

What she did was to bring her feminine sharpness of wit, her feminine 

clear-thinking, to bear upon it. Thus attacked, it yielded quickly, and 

once it had been brought to order it was easy for other persons to carry 

on what she had begun. But the opinion of a man's world still prefers to 

credit her success to some mysterious angelical quality, unstatable in 

lucid terms and having no more reality than the divine inspiration of an 

archbishop. Her extraordinarily acute and accurate intelligence is thus 

conveniently put upon the table, and the amour propre of man is kept 

inviolate. To confess frankly that she had more sense than any male 

Englishman of her generation would be to utter a truth too harsh to be 

bearable. 

 

The second delusion commonly shows itself in the theory, already 

discussed, that women are devoid of any sex instinct--that they submit 

to the odious caresses of the lubricious male only by a powerful effort 

of the will, and with the sole object of discharging their duty to 

posterity. It would be impossible to go into this delusion with proper 

candour and at due length in a work designed for reading aloud in the 

domestic circle; all I can do is to refer the student to the books of 

any competent authority on the psychology of sex, say Ellis, or to the 

confidences (if they are obtainable) of any complaisant bachelor of his 

acquaintance. 

 

39. Women as Christians 

 

 

The glad tidings preached by Christ were obviously highly favourable 

to women. He lifted them to equality before the Lord when their 

very possession of souls was still doubted by the majority of rival 

theologians. Moreover, He esteemed them socially and set value upon 


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