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Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

I point for example, to the literature of the subsidiary question of 

woman suffrage. It fills whole libraries, but nine tenths of it is 

merely rubbish, for it starts off from assumptions that are obviously 

untrue and it reaches conclusions that are at war with both logic 

and the facts. So with the question of sex specifically. I have read, 

literally, hundreds of volumes upon it, and uncountable numbers of 

pamphlets, handbills and inflammatory wall-cards, and yet it leaves the 

primary problem unsolved, which is to say, the problem as to what is to 

be done about the conflict between the celibacy enforced upon millions 

by civilization and the appetites implanted in all by God. In the 

main, it counsels yielding to celibacy, which is exactly as sensible as 

advising a dog to forget its fleas. Here, as in other fields, I do not 

presume to offer a remedy of my own. In truth, I am very suspicious of 

all remedies for the major ills of life, and believe that most of 

them are incurable. But I at least venture to discuss the matter 

realistically, and if what I have to say is not sagacious, it is at 

all events not evasive. This, I hope, is something. Maybe some later 

investigator will bring a better illumination to the subject. 

 

It is the custom of The Free-Lance Series to print a paragraph or two 

about the author in each volume. I was born in Baltimore, September 12, 

1880, and come of a learned family, though my immediate forebears were 

business men. The tradition of this ancient learning has been upon me 

since my earliest days, and I narrowly escaped becoming a doctor 

of philosophy. My father's death, in 1899, somehow dropped me into 

journalism, where I had a successful career, as such careers go. At 

the age of 25 I was the chief editor of a daily newspaper in Baltimore. 

During the same year I published my first book of criticism. Thereafter, 

for ten or twelve years, I moved steadily from practical journalism, 

with its dabbles in politics, economics and soon, toward purely 

aesthetic concerns, chiefly literature and music, but of late I have 

felt a strong pull in the other direction, and what interests me chiefly 

today is what may be called public psychology, ie., the nature of the 

ideas that the larger masses of men hold, and the processes whereby they 

reach them. If I do any serious writing hereafter, it will be in that 

field. In the United States I am commonly held suspect as a foreigner, 


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