Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

notions that seemed to have escaped the peasants of Europe and Asia. 

But in the end, at some cost to the form of the work, I managed to get 

through it without compromise, and so it was put into type. There is 

no need to add that my ideational abstinence went unrecognized and 

unrewarded. In fact, not a single American reviewer noticed it, and most 

of them slated the book violently as a mass of heresies and contumacies, 

a deliberate attack upon all the known and revered truths about the 

woman question, a headlong assault upon the national decencies. In the 

South, where the suspicion of ideas goes to extraordinary lengths, even 

for the United States, some of the newspapers actually denounced the 

book as German propaganda, designed to break down American morale, and 

called upon the Department of Justice to proceed against me for the 

crime known to American law as "criminal anarchy," i.e., "imagining the 

King's death." Why the Comstocks did not forbid it the mails as lewd and 

lascivious I have never been able to determine. Certainly, they received 

many complaints about it. I myself, in fact, caused a number of these 

complaints to be lodged, in the hope that the resultant buffooneries 

would give me entertainment in those dull days of war, with all 

intellectual activities adjourned, and maybe promote the sale of the 

book. But the Comstocks were pursuing larger fish, and so left me to 

the righteous indignation of right-thinking reviewers, especially 

the suffragists. Their concern, after all, is not with books that are 

denounced; what they concentrate their moral passion on is the book that 

is praised. 

 

The present edition is addressed to a wider audience, in more 

civilized countries, and so I have felt free to introduce a number 

of propositions, not to be found in popular proverbs, that had to be 

omitted from the original edition. But even so, the book by no means 

pretends to preach revolutionary doctrines, or even doctrines of any 

novelty. All I design by it is to set down in more or less plain form 

certain ideas that practically every civilized man and woman holds 

in petto, but that have been concealed hitherto by the vast mass of 

sentimentalities swathing the whole woman question. It is a question of 

capital importance to all human beings, and it deserves to be discussed 

honestly and frankly, but there is so much of social reticence, of 

religious superstition and of mere emotion intermingled with it that 

most of the enormous literature it has thrown off is hollow and useless. 


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