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Table of contents
Introduction
The Feminine Mind-1
The War Between the Sexes-2.1
The War Between the Sexes-2.2
The War Between the Sexes-2.3
Marriage-3.1
Marriage-3.2
Marriage-3.3
Marriage-3.4
Woman Suffrage-4.1
Woman Suffrage-4.2
Woman Suffrage-4.3
Woman Suffrage-4.4
The New Age-5.1
The New Age-5.2
The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana. INTRODUCTION
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-1-2
THE VATSYAYANA SUTRA-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-1-2
OF SEXUAL UNION-3-4-5
OF SEXUAL UNION-6-7-8
OF SEXUAL UNION-10-11
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE-3-4-5
ABOUT A WIFE-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-1-2
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-3-4
ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN-5-6
ABOUT COURTESANS-1-2
ABOUT COURTESANS-3-4
ABOUT COURTESANS-5-6
ABOUT THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO YOURSELF-1-2
CONCLUDING REMARKS

it has come to be immoral. And many other planes, high and low. For an 

American to question any of the articles of fundamental faith cherished 

by the majority is for him to run grave risks of social disaster. The 

old English offence of "imagining the King's death" has been formally 

revived by the American courts, and hundreds of men and women are in 

jail for committing it, and it has been so enormously extended that, in 

some parts of the country at least, it now embraces such remote acts 

as believing that the negroes should have equality before the law, and 

speaking the language of countries recently at war with the Republic, 

and conveying to a private friend a formula for making synthetic gin. 

All such toyings with illicit ideas are construed as attentats against 

democracy, which, in a sense, perhaps they are. For democracy is 

grounded upon so childish a complex of fallacies that they must be 

protected by a rigid system of taboos, else even half-wits would argue 

it to pieces. Its first concern must thus be to penalize the free play 

of ideas. In the United States this is not only its first concern, but 

also its last concern. No other enterprise, not even the trade in public 

offices and contracts, occupies the rulers of the land so steadily, or 

makes heavier demands upon their ingenuity and their patriotic passion. 

 

Familiar with the risks flowing out of it--and having just had to 

change the plates of my "Book of Prefaces," a book of purely literary 

criticism, wholly without political purpose or significance, in order 

to get it through the mails, I determined to make this brochure upon the 

woman question extremely pianissimo in tone, and to avoid burdening it 

with any ideas of an unfamiliar, and hence illegal nature. So deciding, 

I presently added a bravura touch: the unquenchable vanity of the 

intellectual snob asserting itself over all prudence. That is to say, 

I laid down the rule that no idea should go into the book that was 

not already so obvious that it had been embodied in the proverbial 

philosophy, or folk-wisdom, of some civilized nation, including the 

Chinese. To this rule I remained faithful throughout. In its original 

form, as published in 1918, the book was actually just such a pastiche of 

proverbs, many of them English, and hence familiar even to Congressmen, 

newspaper editors and other such illiterates. It was not always easy 

to hold to this program; over and over again I was tempted to insert 


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